Soprano Amelia Wilber has been surrounded by music since birth. Beginning her studies with the violin, Ms. Wilber also played the cello and sang in church choirs. It was from there that her interest in singing grew. In her earlier years Ms. Wilber sang with The Temple University Children’s Choir where she got the opportunity to work with some of the top musical minds and organizations in the world (The Philadelphia Orchestra, Orchestra 2001, The Philly Pops, Riccardo Muti, Christoph Eschenbach, and Peter Nero). It became clear that music was her future.

In 2007 Ms. Wilber attended Temple University where she earned her Bachelor of Music in Voice Performance. In 2013 Ms. Wilber attended The Boston Conservatory where she earned her Master of Music in Voice Performance. It is the experiences in these formative years that gave her the drive to pursue a career in Classical Music.

Ms. Wilber has been lucky enough to perform with some of the top institutions and some of the best up and coming companies in The United States (Opera Delaware, OperaMass, Lowell House Opera, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and The Princeton Singers). Her performances and studies have taken her to France, Italy, Germany, China and various parts of the United States.

 

A student of Nadine Secunde, Ms. Wilber splits her time between Germany and The United States.

Ms. Wilber’s previous seasons have seen appearances as an ensemble member and soloist with The Philadelphia Symphonic Choir, Opera Delaware, The Delaware Valley Opera Company, The Princeton Singers and The Philadelphia Chapter of Opera on Tap.  

Previous roles and scenes appearances include Nicolai's The Merry Wives of Windsor (Alice Ford), Mozart's Don Giovanni (Donna Elvira), Tchaikovsky's Pique Dame (Ensemble), Puccini's Suor Angelica (Una Conversa and Ensemble), Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier(Octavian), Nicolai's The Merry Wives of Windsor (Meg Page), Mozart's Die Zauberflöte (Second Lady), Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro (Cherubino), Jack Beeson's Lizzie Borden (Lizzie), Poulenc's Les mamelles de Tirésias (Ensemble), and Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen (Hen and Ensemble).



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